Landscaping with Natives

 

San Diego County is home to a rising population. This means less water to share in a region known for little rainfall. On top of that, California is experiencing a drought. To put it simply, we live in a region where water, one of our most precious resources, is limited but in high demand. Instead of expansive lawns and water-thirsty landscapes, why not add color, beneficial habitat, and water savings to your landscape?

landscape with poppies

Photo by Jitze Couperus, Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

2014 ConservationDistWebPics-33Photo by Kenneth Ray Seals

 

California native plants are acclimated for the region’s climate and rainfall amounts. They attract native birds and pollinators and some plants bring the added benefit of being more fire resistant because they have less fuel than non-native plants. In addition, native plants require little or no fertilizer. California native landscapes are both beautiful and beneficial!

 

Why Choose Native Plants?

  • They are acclimated for the region’s climate and rainfall amounts.
  • They need little water once established.
  • They attract native birds and pollinators.
  • More fire resistant because they have less fuel than non-native plants.
  • Native plants require little or no fertilizer.
  • California native landscapes are both beautiful and beneficial!

california native plant gardenPhoto by Mechanoid Dolly, Flickr (CC BY-SA 2.0)

drought tolerant plants

Design your new landscape!

  1. Analyze your site. Coastal or inland location affects plant selection.  Slopes, low spots, sunny and shady areas, wind and soil types all affect success.  A detailed understanding of your property will save many future dollars and headaches.
  2. Make a list of what you desire and need from your garden.  Entertaining, vegetable gardening, enhancing or hiding a view, or play areas for kids and pets are all examples of some of the features a California friendly landscape can offer.
  3. California friendly trees, shrubs, and groundcovers can satisfy almost any desire for fragrance, color, size, and texture. 
  4. Group plants with similar water needs together.  Place your thirstiest selections in high traffic or visible areas.

With these ideas in hand, you are ready to put the design on paper.  If your skills and interest are high, jump in. If you choose to seek assistance, ask for references and training of the person you hire. 

2014 ConservationDistWebPics-22Photo by Kenneth Ray Seals

Native Landscaping Resources